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  • missuniversepredictions - Gabriel | MU Predictions @missuniversepredictions 1 hour ago
  • @madisonandersonberrios is one of the most confident women we will see on the Miss Universe stage! She is one of my big favorites, I believe Puerto Rico can reach a Top 5 again and has a real chance of winning the 6th crown. Do you think Madison could be our Miss Universe 2019? @madisonandersonberrios is one of the most confident women we will see on the Miss Universe stage! She is one of my big favorites, I believe Puerto Rico can reach a Top 5 again and has a real chance of winning the 6th crown. Do you think Madison could be our Miss Universe 2019?
  • @madisonandersonberrios is one of the most confident women we will see on the Miss Universe stage! She is one of my big favorites, I believe Puerto Rico can reach a Top 5 again and has a real chance of winning the 6th crown. Do you think Madison could be our Miss Universe 2019?
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  • carnivalvillage - Carnival Village Trust @carnivalvillage 4 hours ago
  • #Repost @nhcarnivalldn
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In the middle of Black History Month, we felt it important for all NHC lovers to benefit from having a greater understanding of NHC's history. This image is of Kelso Cochrane... Darcus Howe once said "If there weren't race riots in Notting Hill I don't believe that we would have had the Notting Hill Carnival. If it wasn't for the murder of Kelso Cochrane, Carnival wouldn't have happened." Kelso Cochrane was a 32 year old, Antiguan born carpenter, and aspiring lawyer, living in Notting Hill at a time when racial tensions were high. He died after a racially motivated attack on Southam Street (off Goldborne Road) Notting Hill on May 17th 1959 (today a blue plaque marks the spot). His murder had a huge impact on race relations. Reportedly, there were over 1,200 attendees at his funeral (pic 2).. many of whom came to demonstrate solidarity and a show of defiance against racism locally... and with the eyes of the press on them... nationally too. Activism was stepped up to Whitehall (pic 3) when it was felt the investigation into the murder was complacent, and allegations of a police cover up began to circulate. Rab Butler, the then Home Secretary, made an appeal for witnesses in Parliament and went on to launch a public inquiry into race relations. Much activity to ease racial tension within the Notting Hill area preceded Cochrane's murder, leading to a children's street fayre organised my local resident and community activist, Rhaune Laslett (please see previous post for more details). Laslett is reported to have said of her community and her event "We felt that although West Indians, Africans, Irish and many others nationalities all live in a very congested area, there is very little communication between us. If we can infect them with a desire to participate, then this can only have good results." It was this small community street fayre back in the mid 60s that would morph into what we now know as Notting Hill Carnival. Kelso Cochrane's murder still remains unsolved. Please share this post so all can know who Kelso Cochrane was. #blackhistorymonth #blackhistorymonthuk #kelsocochrane #ripkelsocochrane #nhc #nottinghillcarnival #Mu #repost @nhcarnivalldn • • • • • • In the middle of Black History Month, we felt it important for all NHC lovers to benefit from having a greater understanding of NHC's history. This image is of Kelso Cochrane... Darcus Howe once said "If there weren't race riots in Notting Hill I don't believe that we would have had the Notting Hill Carnival. If it wasn't for the murder of Kelso Cochrane, Carnival wouldn't have happened." Kelso Cochrane was a 32 year old, Antiguan born carpenter, and aspiring lawyer, living in Notting Hill at a time when racial tensions were high. He died after a racially motivated attack on Southam Street (off Goldborne Road) Notting Hill on May 17th 1959 (today a blue plaque marks the spot). His murder had a huge impact on race relations. Reportedly, there were over 1,200 attendees at his funeral (pic 2).. many of whom came to demonstrate solidarity and a show of defiance against racism locally... and with the eyes of the press on them... nationally too. Activism was stepped up to Whitehall (pic 3) when it was felt the investigation into the murder was complacent, and allegations of a police cover up began to circulate. Rab Butler, the then Home Secretary, made an appeal for witnesses in Parliament and went on to launch a public inquiry into race relations. Much activity to ease racial tension within the Notting Hill area preceded Cochrane's murder, leading to a children's street fayre organised my local resident and community activist, Rhaune Laslett (please see previous post for more details). Laslett is reported to have said of her community and her event "We felt that although West Indians, Africans, Irish and many others nationalities all live in a very congested area, there is very little communication between us. If we can infect them with a desire to participate, then this can only have good results." It was this small community street fayre back in the mid 60s that would morph into what we now know as Notting Hill Carnival. Kelso Cochrane's murder still remains unsolved. Please share this post so all can know who Kelso Cochrane was. #blackhistorymonth #blackhistorymonthuk #kelsocochrane #ripkelsocochrane #nhc #nottinghillcarnival #mu
  • #repost @nhcarnivalldn • • • • • • In the middle of Black History Month, we felt it important for all NHC lovers to benefit from having a greater understanding of NHC's history. This image is of Kelso Cochrane... Darcus Howe once said "If there weren't race riots in Notting Hill I don't believe that we would have had the Notting Hill Carnival. If it wasn't for the murder of Kelso Cochrane, Carnival wouldn't have happened." Kelso Cochrane was a 32 year old, Antiguan born carpenter, and aspiring lawyer, living in Notting Hill at a time when racial tensions were high. He died after a racially motivated attack on Southam Street (off Goldborne Road) Notting Hill on May 17th 1959 (today a blue plaque marks the spot). His murder had a huge impact on race relations. Reportedly, there were over 1,200 attendees at his funeral (pic 2).. many of whom came to demonstrate solidarity and a show of defiance against racism locally... and with the eyes of the press on them... nationally too. Activism was stepped up to Whitehall (pic 3) when it was felt the investigation into the murder was complacent, and allegations of a police cover up began to circulate. Rab Butler, the then Home Secretary, made an appeal for witnesses in Parliament and went on to launch a public inquiry into race relations. Much activity to ease racial tension within the Notting Hill area preceded Cochrane's murder, leading to a children's street fayre organised my local resident and community activist, Rhaune Laslett (please see previous post for more details). Laslett is reported to have said of her community and her event "We felt that although West Indians, Africans, Irish and many others nationalities all live in a very congested area, there is very little communication between us. If we can infect them with a desire to participate, then this can only have good results." It was this small community street fayre back in the mid 60s that would morph into what we now know as Notting Hill Carnival. Kelso Cochrane's murder still remains unsolved. Please share this post so all can know who Kelso Cochrane was. #blackhistorymonth #blackhistorymonthuk #kelsocochrane #ripkelsocochrane #nhc #nottinghillcarnival #mu
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