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socialdevelopment - 25821 posts

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  • pta_sensory_gym - PTA Sensory Gym @pta_sensory_gym 4 hours ago
  • Posted @withrepost • @mrsspeechiep I know a lot of SLPs are uncomfortable with pragmatic evaluations. I get it, it’s not easily measured by formal tests AND we are just so good at prompting that sometimes we overprompt and miss social language deficits. So, here are my fav pragmatic assessment tips! 
First up, remember social language competencies develop SUPER EARLY. Kids should be asking questions at a young age and they quickly start engaging in back and forth (albeit superficial) conversations. 
I get the need to have formal tests, but Imo there’s no good formal measure. Plenty of kids are able to answer questions and tell you what they “should do” when given a hypothetical situation - but observe them in PE and they can’t do the “expected” thing. This is because many things impact actual life- impulsivity, sensory sensitivity, reading non verbal cues, multitasking, emotions or anxiety- it’s a lot. So I prefer informal observations and assessment. 
Things to note: Does the child initiate interactions or are they mostly responding? Do they track the speaker? Are they monologueing at others or is there give and take of conversation? Can they sustain nonpreferred topics? How is their play- is it appropriate or unusual or repetitive? 
My favorite thing to do is have a conversation. Start with “tell me about yourself”- of if that’s too difficult, ask a few simple yes/no or familiar questions. And WAIT. And then wait some more. And a little more. I know you are uncomfortable now, but is the child? Did they ask you a question or try to fill the silence? Do they have a preferred topic or use words repetitively? Give them conversational leads and wait- lots of kids can respond to “I did the coolest thing yesterday!” But can they follow up on, “I have a dog”? That’s much harder! 
Eye contact is tricky bc most people will make eye contact at some point. But do they look when they ask you a question? Or when they show you something? Or if you ignore something they say/do? Or maybe they are staring you down and it’s making you uncomfortable (this is NOT appropriate eye contact!) Last, social language disorders are NOT only present with autism. Posted @withrepost@mrsspeechiep I know a lot of SLPs are uncomfortable with pragmatic evaluations. I get it, it’s not easily measured by formal tests AND we are just so good at prompting that sometimes we overprompt and miss social language deficits. So, here are my fav pragmatic assessment tips! First up, remember social language competencies develop SUPER EARLY. Kids should be asking questions at a young age and they quickly start engaging in back and forth (albeit superficial) conversations. I get the need to have formal tests, but Imo there’s no good formal measure. Plenty of kids are able to answer questions and tell you what they “should do” when given a hypothetical situation - but observe them in PE and they can’t do the “expected” thing. This is because many things impact actual life- impulsivity, sensory sensitivity, reading non verbal cues, multitasking, emotions or anxiety- it’s a lot. So I prefer informal observations and assessment. Things to note: Does the child initiate interactions or are they mostly responding? Do they track the speaker? Are they monologueing at others or is there give and take of conversation? Can they sustain nonpreferred topics? How is their play- is it appropriate or unusual or repetitive? My favorite thing to do is have a conversation. Start with “tell me about yourself”- of if that’s too difficult, ask a few simple yes/no or familiar questions. And WAIT. And then wait some more. And a little more. I know you are uncomfortable now, but is the child? Did they ask you a question or try to fill the silence? Do they have a preferred topic or use words repetitively? Give them conversational leads and wait- lots of kids can respond to “I did the coolest thing yesterday!” But can they follow up on, “I have a dog”? That’s much harder! Eye contact is tricky bc most people will make eye contact at some point. But do they look when they ask you a question? Or when they show you something? Or if you ignore something they say/do? Or maybe they are staring you down and it’s making you uncomfortable (this is NOT appropriate eye contact!) Last, social language disorders are NOT only present with autism.
  • Posted @withrepost@mrsspeechiep I know a lot of SLPs are uncomfortable with pragmatic evaluations. I get it, it’s not easily measured by formal tests AND we are just so good at prompting that sometimes we overprompt and miss social language deficits. So, here are my fav pragmatic assessment tips! First up, remember social language competencies develop SUPER EARLY. Kids should be asking questions at a young age and they quickly start engaging in back and forth (albeit superficial) conversations. I get the need to have formal tests, but Imo there’s no good formal measure. Plenty of kids are able to answer questions and tell you what they “should do” when given a hypothetical situation - but observe them in PE and they can’t do the “expected” thing. This is because many things impact actual life- impulsivity, sensory sensitivity, reading non verbal cues, multitasking, emotions or anxiety- it’s a lot. So I prefer informal observations and assessment. Things to note: Does the child initiate interactions or are they mostly responding? Do they track the speaker? Are they monologueing at others or is there give and take of conversation? Can they sustain nonpreferred topics? How is their play- is it appropriate or unusual or repetitive? My favorite thing to do is have a conversation. Start with “tell me about yourself”- of if that’s too difficult, ask a few simple yes/no or familiar questions. And WAIT. And then wait some more. And a little more. I know you are uncomfortable now, but is the child? Did they ask you a question or try to fill the silence? Do they have a preferred topic or use words repetitively? Give them conversational leads and wait- lots of kids can respond to “I did the coolest thing yesterday!” But can they follow up on, “I have a dog”? That’s much harder! Eye contact is tricky bc most people will make eye contact at some point. But do they look when they ask you a question? Or when they show you something? Or if you ignore something they say/do? Or maybe they are staring you down and it’s making you uncomfortable (this is NOT appropriate eye contact!) Last, social language disorders are NOT only present with autism.
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  • guatemalancoffees - Guatemala Coffees @guatemalancoffees 17 hours ago
  • We support #WomenInCoffee. Funcafé’s Women Assistance Centers provide integrated health services, education, and nutrition programs aimed at improving living conditions for coffee growing women and their families.
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#GuatemalanCoffees
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Nosotros apoyamos a las #MujeresEnCafé. A través de nuestros Centros de Asistencia para la Mujer, les ofrecemos servicios de salud, educación y nutrición a las mujeres en comunidades rurales. De esta manera mejoramos sus condiciones de vida y la de sus familias. We support #womenincoffee. Funcafé’s Women Assistance Centers provide integrated health services, education, and nutrition programs aimed at improving living conditions for coffee growing women and their families. . #guatemalancoffees . Nosotros apoyamos a las #mujeresencafé. A través de nuestros Centros de Asistencia para la Mujer, les ofrecemos servicios de salud, educación y nutrición a las mujeres en comunidades rurales. De esta manera mejoramos sus condiciones de vida y la de sus familias.
  • We support #womenincoffee. Funcafé’s Women Assistance Centers provide integrated health services, education, and nutrition programs aimed at improving living conditions for coffee growing women and their families. . #guatemalancoffees . Nosotros apoyamos a las #mujeresencafé. A través de nuestros Centros de Asistencia para la Mujer, les ofrecemos servicios de salud, educación y nutrición a las mujeres en comunidades rurales. De esta manera mejoramos sus condiciones de vida y la de sus familias.
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  • pta_sensory_gym - PTA Sensory Gym @pta_sensory_gym 1 day ago
  • Posted @withrepost • @autism.nutritionist When you say he loves pizza do you mean that ONE kind of pizza? Or ALL pizza?
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Do your child’s rigid preferences seem random? Frustrating when you KNOW they’d like it if they could just try?
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They’re probably frustrated too.
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Preferences often stem from comfort and familiarity. Packaged foods (like that frozen pizza) is the same every time.
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That means no surprises, no discomfort, nothing new to figure out or get used to.
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Your child’s sensory food aversions are real. But they don’t have to be a forever thing or something that holds them back from enjoying food or participating in social situations. Posted @withrepost@autism.nutritionist When you say he loves pizza do you mean that ONE kind of pizza? Or ALL pizza? ⠀⠀ Do your child’s rigid preferences seem random? Frustrating when you KNOW they’d like it if they could just try? ⠀⠀ They’re probably frustrated too. ⠀⠀ Preferences often stem from comfort and familiarity. Packaged foods (like that frozen pizza) is the same every time. ⠀⠀ That means no surprises, no discomfort, nothing new to figure out or get used to. ⠀⠀ Your child’s sensory food aversions are real. But they don’t have to be a forever thing or something that holds them back from enjoying food or participating in social situations.
  • Posted @withrepost@autism.nutritionist When you say he loves pizza do you mean that ONE kind of pizza? Or ALL pizza? ⠀⠀ Do your child’s rigid preferences seem random? Frustrating when you KNOW they’d like it if they could just try? ⠀⠀ They’re probably frustrated too. ⠀⠀ Preferences often stem from comfort and familiarity. Packaged foods (like that frozen pizza) is the same every time. ⠀⠀ That means no surprises, no discomfort, nothing new to figure out or get used to. ⠀⠀ Your child’s sensory food aversions are real. But they don’t have to be a forever thing or something that holds them back from enjoying food or participating in social situations.
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  • pta_sensory_gym - PTA Sensory Gym @pta_sensory_gym 2 days ago
  • Thank you 🙌🏻 @parentingisascience Believe it or not, yelling doesn’t actually work to change behavior long term. Research shows that yelling is one of the least effective ways to change behavior. •
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Why?! Well one of the reasons is because you are telling the child what NOT to do rather than what the should do. •
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Remember, parents are their child’s first teacher and we need to teach them how to behave, not just tell them what not to do. •
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In addition to the ineffectiveness, yelling also has a variety of side effects. The most prevalent being that yelling actually teaches yelling. You are modeling for your child that when there is a problem, you solve it by yelling.
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Rather than yell; calmly teach your child what they should be doing and then provide praise when they engage in desirable behaviors!!! Thank you 🙌🏻 @parentingisascience Believe it or not, yelling doesn’t actually work to change behavior long term. Research shows that yelling is one of the least effective ways to change behavior. • • Why?! Well one of the reasons is because you are telling the child what NOT to do rather than what the should do. • • Remember, parents are their child’s first teacher and we need to teach them how to behave, not just tell them what not to do. • • In addition to the ineffectiveness, yelling also has a variety of side effects. The most prevalent being that yelling actually teaches yelling. You are modeling for your child that when there is a problem, you solve it by yelling. • • Rather than yell; calmly teach your child what they should be doing and then provide praise when they engage in desirable behaviors!!!
  • Thank you 🙌🏻 @parentingisascience Believe it or not, yelling doesn’t actually work to change behavior long term. Research shows that yelling is one of the least effective ways to change behavior. • • Why?! Well one of the reasons is because you are telling the child what NOT to do rather than what the should do. • • Remember, parents are their child’s first teacher and we need to teach them how to behave, not just tell them what not to do. • • In addition to the ineffectiveness, yelling also has a variety of side effects. The most prevalent being that yelling actually teaches yelling. You are modeling for your child that when there is a problem, you solve it by yelling. • • Rather than yell; calmly teach your child what they should be doing and then provide praise when they engage in desirable behaviors!!!
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